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Justin Kuraitis speaks on Postlegate for the first time

Postlegate reached a turning point in the last few days. 62 of the 89 plaintiffs agreed to accept the settlement from Stones Gambling Hall. 

Stones Gambling Hall is paying those 62 plaintiffs to drop the charges and state that they do not think Stones and Justin Kuraitis are guilty of helping Postle cheat. PR folks from Stones have stated that the settlement is just a “nominal amount” and is merely to “show goodwill.” Though as yet they are keeping mum on the exact figure.

Stones counsel have described this as a “complete vindication.”

That might be overstating the case. However, it has certainly been enough to give Justin Kuraitis who has remained silent since the accusations first started to fly — the freedom to put his head up and take a few potshots at his accusers.

“On the advice of counsel, I have remained silent and not commented on the parade of false accusations that have been leveled against me,” Kuraitis wrote in a four-page missive released on Twitter. “Now that this is over, I want to move on.”

The Kuraitis case

Kuraitis wrote: “In the fall of 2019, I watched as the “poker community” and wanna-be “celebrity” commentators on Twitter/YouTube falsely accused me of being a knowing participant in what was allegedly the “biggest poker cheating scandal in history.”” 

Kuraitis refers readers to the largely pro-Postle reporting of RounderLife. RounderLife displays a permanent link to their Postlegate coverage in their side menu.

As yet, the players who haven’t taken a payout from Stones have not recanted. Many of the 27 remaining plaintiffs show signs of wanting to continue pursuing the matter. What form this will take is up in the air as the plaintiff’s counsel has bowed out.

Stones Tweeted that “Plaintiffs counsel clears Stones and employee of any wrongdoing.”

Veronica Brill’s response was sharp and to the point: “Ummm I didn’t.”

It doesn’t sound like she is letting the matter drop.

Fair and biased

Kuraitis takes issue with the proceedings in his Twitter letter.

“I watched in utter amazement as Joey Ingram devoted hour after hour to “PostleGate.” Some of the videos were entertaining and they certainly were great for increasing Ingram’s popularity.”

This is a letter about how people shouldn’t accuse other people of actions, without having evidence. Yet in it, Kuraitis gives nearly a full page to accusing Veronica Brill of all manner of things.

“When I asked her if she had any basis for her claim or anything to support it, Veronica had nothing but her suspicion […] Veronica has this penchant for making outrageous statements and frivolous claims about people […] Veronica texted her player list to me for her game and Mike Postle was on it. In fact, Veronica continued to invite Postle on every list that she sent me after that conversation […] What kind of hero invites her other friends to a game with someone she suspected of cheating?”

Inconsequential

“The Twitter mob is real, it is ugly, and it has real-life consequences,” Kureitis writes. Then he goes on to call himself a victim.

But, those consequences are a little unclear at the moment. Despite being accused of helping a player to cheat, he has kept his job at a casino. He never even missed a paycheck. As part of the settlement by his employers, the plaintiffs have dropped the case against him.

Now it looks like he will get to move on with his life. The real question now is: Will the poker community let him?

Featured image: Twitter

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